Alabama - HE K-12 curriculum—ES: Curricula

Area: 
Curricula
Policy Type: 
statute; standard
Summary: 

State law requires elementary HE curriculum.

Code of Alabama 16-35-5 Studies required to be taught in elementary school

In every elementary school in the state there shall be taught reading, spelling and writing, arithmetic, oral and written English, geography, history of the United States and Alabama, elementary science, health education, physical education and such other studies as may be prescribed by the State Board of Education.


Code of Alabama 16-6B-2 Core curriculum

In every elementary school there shall be taught at least reading including phonics, spelling, handwriting, arithmetic, oral and written English, geography, history of the United States and Alabama, elementary science, hygiene and sanitation, physical education, the arts, including musical and visual arts, environmental protection, and such other studies as may be prescribed by the local board of education.


Alabama Course of Study: Health Education Preface

The 2009 Alabama Course of Study: Health Education provides the framework for the health education program in Alabama’s public schools. Content standards and related content included in bullets in this document are minimum and required (Code of Alabama, 1975, §16-35-4). They are fundamental and specific but not exhaustive. In developing local curriculum, school systems may include additional content standards to reflect local philosophies and add implementation guidelines, resources, and activities; which, by design, are not contained in this document.

The 2008-2009 Health Education State Course of Study Subcommittee extensively used the National Health Education Standards: Achieving Excellence, the Alabama Course of Study: Health Education (Bulletin 2003, No. 5), and reports published by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in developing the minimum required content. In addition, Subcommittee members attended state, regional, and national conferences; read articles in professional journals and other publications; reviewed similar curriculum documents from other states; listened to and read statements from interested individuals and groups throughout the state; used each member’s academic and experiential knowledge; and discussed issues among themselves and with colleagues. Finally, the Subcommittee reached consensus and developed what it believes to be the best possible health education curriculum for Alabama’s K-12 students.
Alabama State Department of Education

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